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Why doesn’t anyone tell Goliath’s version of the story?

Malcom Gladwell’s new book David and Goliath has renewed our enthusiasm for the underdog, the misfit, the one whose gifts don’t suggest any hint of possible success. As Gladwell says about David, he was the competitor who “shouldn’t have won.” “Everyone loves an underdog,” says Anderson Cooper in his 60 Minutes introduction to Gladwell’s segment […]

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Why I build tools that promote understanding

Peter Drucker long ago said that organizations are no longer built on force; they’re built on trust. He went on to clarify his point by saying that trust didn’t necessarily mean that people liked each other or wanted to spend more time together. It simply meant people understood one another The tricky aspect of trust […]

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Creative tension and other lessons from Martin Luther King, Jr.

Last night I attended a panel discussion at the Washington National Cathedral on Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “Letter from Birmingham City Jail.” The panel included U.S. Poet Laureate Natasha Trethewey; Yale Law professor Stephen L. Carter; American civil rights leader Julian Bond; Washington National Cathedral Dean Gary Hall; and moderator Aspen Institute President and CEO Walter Isaacson. During […]

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Trusted partnerships rely on a two-way street

For decades, non-governmental organizations have ranked corporations in terms of their environmental responsibility. Now, corporations are turning the tables and ranking NGOs for their integrity, effectiveness, and overall level of influence. The GreenBiz Group, based in Oakland California just released a fascinating report that assess NGO performance based on feedback from over 200 companies. Whereas […]

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Massive Crises Put Culture on Display

Over the past several years, I’ve studied the role of trust in massive social and environmental crises and two remarkable events stand out from the pack: the BP Oil Spill (Deepwater Horizon) and the Chilean Mine Rescue. By comparing these events, it’s easy to see how corporate culture influences crisis management. Moreover because the crises […]

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Trust Communication

The essence of trust communication can be demonstrated through this well-known and often undervalued assessment process. In any enterprise, three basic principles guide all planning and strategy discussions: To know where you have been, where you are going, and how you will get there.  Despite their modest tone and unsophisticated style, these questions drive an […]

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Trust leadership and communication compendium

This page is your reference guide for learning about trust leadership and trust communication in today’s uncertain economic environment. Following are web-based reference materials that inform some of the strategies and theories described on this website. Ultimately, leaders will want to understand the root of these issues. Here, I make that possible. Currently, this resource […]

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Audience Centric Communication

Why does your business need audience centric communication? In short, because no one believes the things companies say, any longer. Words have lost their power to persuade in these days of cynicism and distrust. Regardless of the size of your marketing department and the amount of your advertising budget, it is not possible to influence […]

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Audience Centricity

To understand audience centricity, it’s helpful to review recent evolutions in organizational design. Business leadership has evolved significantly, and almost dramatically, in the past half century, fueled by changes in the broader economy.  Responding to changes in societal values and customer needs, businesses have changed their internal organizational models. Though, not always for the better. […]

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The art of the apology: Will JCPenney’s strategy work?

Apologies are a delicate matter, and the success of an apology can depend more on the type of error than the nature of the confession. People tend to be forgiving of errors caused by lack of experience or inability to perform in a challenging environment. U.C. Davis professors Kimberly Elsbach and Steven Currall say these […]

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